David Kendall Strelitz owns and manages 6,500 acres. He began farming out west in1962 just as another historical drought started; that drought continued until 1965. Mr Strelitz believes farming is in the blood and he has two sons who help on the properties but this prolonged drought season is difficult. "I remember the summer of 2016 we started to feed and then we stopped because we got some growth. then the same again 2017 but a bit more feeding. But now I have spent about 1.3 million dollars in this drought. But now the calf is sucking on the cows and the cows are going down. But before they calved we could have killed them but can't do that now. I have now about 950 calves. "I have four men here who get sour working seven days a week and as they don't like seeing the weak stock Mr David Strelitiz said. "The government needs to get out there and have a go. "I am heading for 80 years age on November 15 and I am very glad I am still upright," Mr Strelitz concluded. Mr Strelitz believes that the weather bureau forecasting rain and no rain arriving is a hardship that is unbearable. Farmers look up the weather charts relying on the weather forecaster gibing them hope. what the ordinary farmer is left with is no hope when the predicted rain does not arrive. This is a form of torture brought on by uncertainty. Mr Strelitz commented that, "no one else talks about the weather forecast, we think there is no end, then the weather bureau will predict rain, in four days, rain we feel hope and what that does to us is, gut wrenching. "The lack of certainty results in depression and if the farmers do not talk about it they will think suicide. the farmers know that they are at risk of death as they watch starving cattle die. "The sad thing about this drought like any drought you don't know how long it is going to go for. "If I knew it was going to rain in six weeks then I could give it a go but at the moment it just eats my guts out. There is a direct impact on the weather reports that predicting rain. I think they should be able to forecast what is going to happen. "If you try to talk to another farmer about it, they look at it like why are you butting into my business, and I am the same. I don't want to talk to anyone about it. "You have to have some time away from it, it eats your gut out, the only thing that is growing here at the moment is my ulcer, I wake up at 1.30 am, I think where do I go next. what do I do with my stock. I drive around them and I become completely depressed.I am doing as much as I can. I can't do any more and they are just getting worse and worse. Spring is now. Cattle are calving in the paddocks which is an added stress for owners when cattle are too weak to raise their calves: this is a part of a drought, weak cattle, not enough feed to raise calves or lambs, and the stock can't be sold or fed. "They are getting poorer and poorer and starting to die. The water is just vanishing we have to try and cart water to cattle and that is impossible and we can't sell them. At this point I can't sell cows and calves, they need support, food, until it rains, your stock has to be strong enough to take to market. No one is going to buy a weak cow with a calf to feed, no one will buy that at this time, so I will have to sell the rest of my herd. Perhaps I should have sold more sooner before they calved," Mr Strelitz said. "On an average season I carry 2,400 cattle. I now have destocked but I should have sold more than I did, everyone says that when it ends you won't be able to get the cattle. "The stock is getting unsaleable, and the aim was to keep them but we might end up shooting them. I have 6,5000 acres and I did not want to end up with nothing on it, not being able to produce beef. "I have had my fellas on the phone this morning we are going to run out in three weeks, what the hell are you going to do," Mr Strelitz reports. David Strelitz remembers the advice he was given in 1962. The boss out there said "boy get a chain saw out there and cut the scrub up for them," Mr Strelitz recalled. "Let them die (the sheep) if they are going to die but we will have some money to replace them. But if you start to feed them then you spend your money and you have nothing at the end of it. "He was right. We bought two chain saws, cut down the trees and fed the stock. We did not even have our natural stock losses for the year. So the boss walked away with the same number of sheep." Farmers are reporting the current desperation might leave Australia at risk of overseas purchases of our land. "I heard that there are 95 farms in NSW alone, belonging to other countries than Australia. "Only one doing any good, at the moment, is the export market. Cattle and stock being sold to overseas buyers and off shore, go the profits," Mr Strelitz said. The Armidale Express has recently reported on the 1960's drought. Read more: Local farmers Robert Johnson, John Harvey, and Robert de Veau remember drought over the decades Armidale is celebrated by Sir Owen Croft, as a town that knows more than it recognises. Mr Strelitz turns 80 in November, "what the local farmers know through generations of farming in this area may not go through to the next generation. "It is built in your blood you know when you walk out in the morning if a cow has aborted a calf and you need to take her into the yards and fix her up. "The average person who comes into farming has no chance to learn this. "The people think that when it is all over there we will have a boom in the rural industry but it won't be like that. I seem the market goes up and then the market goes back to an average level. "It will rain and then for a few weeks the cockies will buy some stock to restock and they the cattle will be expensive but they will buy them and then within a couple of months the market will settle back down again," Mr Strelitz continued.

David Kendall Strelitz Grazier from Underwood

David Kendall Strelitz owns and manages 6,500 acres. He began farming out west in1962 just as another historical drought started; that drought continued until 1965. Mr Strelitz believes farming is in the blood and he has two sons who help on the properties but this prolonged drought season is difficult.

"I remember the summer of 2016 we started to feed and then we stopped because we got some growth. then the same again 2017 but a bit more feeding. But now I have spent about 1.3 million dollars in this drought. But now the calf is sucking on the cows and the cows are going down. But before they calved we could have killed them but can't do that now. I have now about 950 calves. "I have four men here who get sour working seven days a week and as they don't like seeing the weak stock Mr David Strelitiz said.

"The government needs to get out there and have a go. "I am heading for 80 years age on November 15 and I am very glad I am still upright," Mr Strelitz concluded.

Mr Strelitz believes that the weather bureau forecasting rain and no rain arriving is a hardship that is unbearable. Farmers look up the weather charts relying on the weather forecaster gibing them hope. what the ordinary farmer is left with is no hope when the predicted rain does not arrive. This is a form of torture brought on by uncertainty.

Mr Strelitz commented that, "no one else talks about the weather forecast, we think there is no end, then the weather bureau will predict rain, in four days, rain we feel hope and what that does to us is, gut wrenching. "The lack of certainty results in depression and if the farmers do not talk about it they will think suicide. the farmers know that they are at risk of death as they watch starving cattle die. "The sad thing about this drought like any drought you don't know how long it is going to go for.

"If I knew it was going to rain in six weeks then I could give it a go but at the moment it just eats my guts out. There is a direct impact on the weather reports that predicting rain. I think they should be able to forecast what is going to happen.

Depression, no male wants to talk about it.

David Strelitz

"If you try to talk to another farmer about it, they look at it like why are you butting into my business, and I am the same. I don't want to talk to anyone about it.

"You have to have some time away from it, it eats your gut out, the only thing that is growing here at the moment is my ulcer, I wake up at 1.30 am, I think where do I go next. what do I do with my stock. I drive around them and I become completely depressed.I am doing as much as I can. I can't do any more and they are just getting worse and worse.

Spring is now. Cattle are calving in the paddocks which is an added stress for owners when cattle are too weak to raise their calves: this is a part of a drought, weak cattle, not enough feed to raise calves or lambs, and the stock can't be sold or fed.

"They are getting poorer and poorer and starting to die. The water is just vanishing we have to try and cart water to cattle and that is impossible and we can't sell them.

At this point I can't sell cows and calves, they need support, food, until it rains, your stock has to be strong enough to take to market. No one is going to buy a weak cow with a calf to feed, no one will buy that at this time, so I will have to sell the rest of my herd. Perhaps I should have sold more sooner before they calved," Mr Strelitz said.

"On an average season I carry 2,400 cattle. I now have destocked but I should have sold more than I did, everyone says that when it ends you won't be able to get the cattle.

"The stock is getting unsaleable, and the aim was to keep them but we might end up shooting them. I have 6,5000 acres and I did not want to end up with nothing on it, not being able to produce beef.

"I have had my fellas on the phone this morning we are going to run out in three weeks, what the hell are you going to do," Mr Strelitz reports.

David Strelitz remembers the advice he was given in 1962. The boss out there said "boy get a chain saw out there and cut the scrub up for them," Mr Strelitz recalled.

"Let them die (the sheep) if they are going to die but we will have some money to replace them. But if you start to feed them then you spend your money and you have nothing at the end of it.

"He was right. We bought two chain saws, cut down the trees and fed the stock. We did not even have our natural stock losses for the year. So the boss walked away with the same number of sheep."

The government believes it will go away when it rains

David Strelitz

Jack Mullany student from UNE on work experience

"Underwood" September 2019

of

Farmers are reporting the current desperation might leave Australia at risk of overseas purchases of our land.

"I heard that there are 95 farms in NSW alone, belonging to other countries than Australia.

"Only one doing any good, at the moment, is the export market. Cattle and stock being sold to overseas buyers and off shore, go the profits," Mr Strelitz said.

The Armidale Express has recently reported on the 1960's drought.

Read more:

Local farmers Robert Johnson, John Harvey, and Robert de Veau remember drought over the decades

Armidale is celebrated by Sir Owen Croft, as a town that knows more than it recognises.

Mr Strelitz turns 80 in November, "what the local farmers know through generations of farming in this area may not go through to the next generation.

"It is built in your blood you know when you walk out in the morning if a cow has aborted a calf and you need to take her into the yards and fix her up.

"The average person who comes into farming has no chance to learn this.

"The people think that when it is all over there we will have a boom in the rural industry but it won't be like that. I seem the market goes up and then the market goes back to an average level.

"It will rain and then for a few weeks the cockies will buy some stock to restock and they the cattle will be expensive but they will buy them and then within a couple of months the market will settle back down again," Mr Strelitz continued.

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